2011: a year in first lines and first photos

I first did a post like this at the end of 2007, and I mean to do another one every year, but … well you know how it goes. Once again, the lines and photos, though mostly completely unrelated, come together to create a picture of the year that will mean the most to me (of course), but that I hope is at least enjoyable to you, Dear Reader. Happy and safe 2012.

January: So here I am at almost 3 in the morning at my mom’s house after driving up from Nashville.
1/365: 2011 - One foot in front of the other.

February: I am upset.
forgot to turn off the flash #genius #mytrees

March: First, comments.
60/365: carpooling @dailyimage2011 #mytrees

April: It’s been over a month since I wrote here.
Darien Statements tag cloud

May: I should break this into smaller posts, but I probably won’t.
0501111100.jpg

June: No worries.
12 #mytrees

July: (nothing written, but there is a theme in these photos…)
picking up Miss6 for a playdate #notmytrees

August: Here I start another journal.
Jack felt like a little scifi while mom was at work. #fb

September: Today, I go to see John.
Today is not a crane day

October: The documentarian in me is compelled to write of all the things that have happened since that Friday in May.

November: Idk what to say to that.
#fridayweeds

December: You really want to know or is that small talk?
Miss6's picture of Miss8's doc looking at her x-ray.

2010: a year in first lines and first photos

January: At the end of 2008, I posted a list of books that I was currently reading, as well as this list of books that I wanted to read in 2009.
New Year's resolution: let @flylady help us end the CHAOS. #fb

February: This is my first from-scratch pattern.
dots and rainbows and stripes  oh my!

March: I’m running for LITA Board member at large.
my sweetie brought me chai in my fave mug. #fb #stilllife

April: Modern digital cameras, whether small hand-held models or digital SLRs, often have more modes and options than the average picture-taker needs, but knowing a bit about how modes work can improve photos.
doesn't this look like the best climbing tree evar? #fb #grans

May: I’ve been working today on a TechSource post about creative ways to use a digital camera in a library and have been wowed and awed by all the great programming that is being documented by libraries on flickr.
miss4 spots the trees

June: Stay on top of the chaos: In sitting down to write Part 5 of this series, “Turning Images into Objects,” I realized I’d gotten ahead of myself.
downsized_0601001036.jpg

July: Three years ago, at the ALA Annual Conference in DC, I wrote this blog post.
roadside food has scaled new heights

August: It’s weird that I have no one to talk to, no one who truly knows the situation.
I got a TARDIS for my birthday! ty  K!

September: So.
foggy

October: I’m on the beach in Clearwater, FL, as the previous few pages weakly attest.
7:21 a.m.

November: Clinical depression is the opposite of addiction.
ohai november!

December: working backward, words I don’t want to lose
snowfall

2009: a year in first lines and photos

January: At the end of 2008, I posted a list of books that I was currently reading, as well as this list of books that I wanted to read in 2009
U2 Honlulu

February: I have a new post on the TechSource blog about my recent experience in Denver.
twittersheep

March: I have a new post at ALA TechSource about my trip at the end of February to Darien Library.
the girls made me Get Well cards

April: Following the “Not-Quite-Summit on the Future of Libraries” event at Darien Library, John Blyberg, Kathryn Greenhill, and I spent a day in John’s office (literally) drawing out the ideas that had sprouted there.
Do you?

May: I recently started using the gmail interface for my work email.
is this ragweed i'm watering along with my zinnias?

June: Vacation, vacation, vacation!
GA Peache's

July: crashing falling plummeting
headed to the 'boro

August: the girls are finally in bed.
38 years ago

September: Had a hard week at work this week.
#fb daily ref reno shot:

October: Notes from the first full day of KLA 2009.
riverview #fb

November: Hearing Rick Anderson’s recent KLA talk, titled “The Five Sacred Cows of Librarianship: Why They No Longer Matter, and Why Two of Them Never Did,” made me wonder what “sacred cows” exist in the field of library technology.
good morning trees!

December: I just finished Infinite Jest, which really had no ending.
opening tomorrow...

2008, a year in first lines and first photos

First blog or journal post of the month, first (public) flickr photo of the month.

January: I was much chagrined to note that the music application on my new phone, the LG Voyager through Verizon wireless, would not run under the Macintosh operating system.
Parallels desktop drag and drop goodness, or: where there's a will, there's a way

February: Almost thirteen years ago, I was adopted by a young gray tabby cat named Marcie.
Tonight's offering...

March: Is this the start of a revolution?
Irony, Illustrated.

April: Web-based library catalogs hit the scene about 10 years ago, and since then, many of them have not changed much.
Huh?

May: At this year’s Computers in Libraries conference, I had the pleasure and privilege of presenting at a session with Roy Tennant, Kate Sheehan, and John Blyberg, with Karen Schneider serving as our emcee.
Video chat in Meebo with Tokbox

June: OK, I’ll admit it, I kind of have a “thing” for bags.
Me and my girls

July: What a rollercoaster week it’s been.
'no dancing or acting like a tard'

August: Jason Puckett, Instruction Program Developer at Emory University and LibGuides creator extraordinaire, marked the completion of his MLS with this wicked awesome librarian tattoo. Congratulations, Jason!
Daviess County Public Library

September: Not that you don’t have plenty of things to read and do, but in case you have missed me in your reader, here are a few things that have caught my eye over the last few weeks while being completely buried at work, at home and with extracurricular libraryland activities.
sp

October: I ran across this tonight in searching for CC-licensed images to use in a presentation.
My LibraryThing Unsuggester page

November: This one-off self portrait was taken for the Message to Obama flickr group and has garnered 556 views, 17 favorites, and 15 comments in the hour that it’s been in my flickr stream.
'I'm Daddy'

December: Is there a resource or person that you turn to time and again to learn about or brush up on your tech skills?
What I'm Reading

Farewell Miss Marcie

Almost thirteen years ago, I was adopted by a young gray tabby cat named Marcie. I had just pulled up to the small cottage occupied by my fiance on Penn St in Georgetown, Kentucky, when she trotted right up to me, sniffed my hand and allowed me to scratch her head. It was absolute love at first sight. I loved her tiny face, the orange spot and black M on her forehead, her little “mrow” and the way that–I swear–she would purse her lips when I scratched under her chin, making her whiskers sweep forward in a trembly little arc. The underside of her chin was white, and the bottoms of her feet looked like she’d sat in a pan of brown paint, an interesting contrast to the rest of her long gray, black and white fur. She loved being cradled like a baby, was an enemy to any potted plant we tried to nurture and once beat a Rottweiler mix into bewildered backpedalling submission just for saying hi.

I knew as soon as I saw her that we would add her to our family. She hung around the house for a few days, and I took her to my vet in Benton, Illinois after she was still hanging out after a week. The poor vet made the mistake of not showing Marcie his electric razor before sneaking up behind her and turning it on; she turned into a feline Taz, whirling and mrowing in an effort to get away. I instinctively grabbed her and got a punctured finger and bitten hand for my effort; since she was a stray, the vet insisted I go for a tetanus shot afterward. After they sedated her, the exam went normally except for one thing: she was pregnant.

Marcie was introduced to my other two cats, Newton and Bloo, after her leukemia and other tests came back negative. At first, they were not impressed, but after a while, they all agreed to get along. I have long suspected that this was because Marcie was good at combing the kitchen counter for morsels, an ability that Newton has great respect for to this day.

We weren’t sure when Marcie would have her kittens, and as the day approached for me to move from Benton back to Georgetown, Ken agreed to take her, reasoning that it would be easier to move pregnant mom rather than mom and kittens. On August 8, 1995, Marcie gave birth to six healthy kittens. Her kittens seemed to consist of three sets of twins: a boy and a girl looked a lot like their mom; two males were red tabbies, one light and one dark; the final two, a boy and a girl, were both jet black. We dubbed them Stripey and Spotley, Newt Light and Newt Jr, and Henry and Harriet. Through the help of an adoption program in Lexington, we found homes for five of the kittens, three of whom went to friends or family. The last one, Harriet, lives with us to this day.